Hansen's Northwest Native Plant Database


Lilium washingtonianum (Washington Lily, Cascade Lily, Mount Hood Lily)

Kingdom

 Plantae Plants

Subkingdom

 Tracheobionta Vascular plants

Superdivision

 Spermatophyta Seed plants

Division

 Magnoliophyta Flowering plants

Class

 Liliopsida Monocotyledons

Subclass

 Liliidae

Order

 Liliales

Family

 Liliaceae Lily family

Genus

 Lilium L. lily

Species

 Lilium washingtonianum Kellogg Washington lily

 

 

Photo at right courtesy of Russell Holmes for US Department of Forestry Celebrating Wildflowers website, www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/lilium_washingtonianum.shtml

As the name implies, this lily is common to regions of Oregon along the Columbia River and Cascade Mountains, and also the California Sierras.

Washington Lily is hardy to USDA zones 8-9, and happiest in dry well drained sunny situations.

This is a tall lily reaching 3-6 tall.

The stalks are covered with fragrant trumpet shaped flowers that are white with dark purple speckles. The flowers will change from white to a purple pink color with age.

This incredible flower is a "must have" for native gardens in temperate climates.

Photo below, left courtesy of Wayne Rolle for US Department of Forestry Celebrating Wildflowers website, www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/lilium_washingtonianum.shtml

The Washington Lily (Lilium washingtonianum) is an amazing perennial, native to Oregon's Mount Hood and ranges down the Cascades and into the California Sierras. In 1859, botanist Albert Kellogg named this spectacular aromatic plant for Martha Washington, the very first woman to be called "first lady."

Native Americans collected the bulbs for food.

The plant was such a hit with gardeners, the local population was decimated by the 1950's. However, with some astute rescue work, they are not in danger of disappearing at this time.

For a short comparison of northwest native lilies, click here.
Contact:  star@chillirose.com ~ Copyright 2012 Wallace W. Hansen ~ All rights reserved